Long-Term Care in America: Increasing Access to Care

The 2018 Long-Term Care Poll continues to track items from the previous years while also exploring new topics, including communication barriers in the health care system, concerns over cultural accommodations, the availability and stability of long-term care services, and openness to forms of telemedicine. Interviews were conducted March 13-April 5, 2018 with 1,945 adults age 18 and older. The sample includes an oversample of 458 Hispanics.

Data were used in the report, “Long-Term Care in America: Increasing Access to Care”, as well as the issue briefs “Communication and Long-Term Care: Technology Use and Cultural Barriers among Hispanics” and “Younger Adults’ Experiences and Views on Long-Term Care”.

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Long-Term Caregiving: The Types of Care Older Americans Provide and the Impact on Work and Family

The 2017 Long-Term Caregiving Poll dives into the experiences of providers and recipients of long-term care, including how caregivers learn to provide care, access to respite programs, experiences balancing work and caregiving, how caregiving responsibilities are divided, and the emotional impact of providing ongoing living assistance. Interviews were conducted June 27-July 31, 2017 with 1,004 adults age 40 and older with past or current experience providing or receiving long-term care. The sample includes 79 percent with experience providing care only, 10 percent with experience receiving care only, and 11 percent who have experience with both.

Data were used in the report, “Long-Term Caregiving: The Types of Care Older Americans Provide and the Impact on Work and Family.”

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Long-Term Care in America: Views on Who Should Bear the Responsibilities and Costs of Care

The 2017 Long-Term Care Poll continues to track items from the previous years while also exploring new topics, including perceptions of the role of home health care aides in providing care, ratings of long-term care services in the local community, attitudes about the country’s preparedness to address the needs of the growing population of older adults, support for new policy proposals to help caregivers, and how much effort the federal government should devote to helping with long-term care costs. Interviews were conducted March 2-29, 2017 with 1,341 adults age 40 and older. The sample includes an oversample of 310 Hispanics age 40 and older.

Data were used in the report, “Long-Term Care in America: Views on Who Should Bear the Responsibilities and Costs of Care,” as well as the issue brief, “Long-Term Care in America: Hispanics’ Cultural Concerns and Difficulties with Care.”

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Long-Term Care in America: Expectations and Preferences for Care and Caregiving

The 2016 Long-Term Care Poll looks at what long-term care services older Americans expect to need in the future, what they anticipate these services to cost, and how much they have planned for those costs. The survey also asks about potential policy changes these older Americans may support to address the costs of care. It continues to track long-term care attitudes and behaviors explored in previous iterations of the survey. Interviews were conducted February 18-April 9, 2016 with 1,698 adults age 40 and older. The sample includes 526 residents of California age 40 and older and an oversample of 400 Hispanics nationwide age 40 and older.

Data were used in the report, “Long-Term Care in America: Expectations and Preferences for Care and Caregiving,” as well as the issue briefs, “Long-Term Care in America: Concerns and Expectations among Hispanics” and “Older Californians’ Long-Term Care Experiences and Policy Preferences.”

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Long-Term Care in America: Americans’ Outlook and Planning for Future Care

The 2015 Long-Term Care Poll continues to track long-term care attitudes and planning behaviors and explores new topics, like person-centered care experiences, the role of private health insurance plans in financing long-term care, and the special challenges faced by those who provide ongoing living assistance to elderly loved ones while also providing financial support to children. Interviews were conducted April 7-May 15, 2015 with 1,735 adults age 40 and older. The sample includes 460 residents of California age 40 and older and an oversample of 419 Hispanics nationwide age 40 and older.

Data were used for the report, “Long-Term Care in America: Americans’ Outlook and Planning for Future Care,” as well as the issue briefs, “Long-Term Care in California: Policy Attitudes and Perceptions” and “Hispanics Expectations and Planning for Long-Term Care.”

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Long-Term Care in America: Expectations and Reality

The 2014 Long-Term Care Poll looks at who is providing and receiving care, how caregiving impacts family relationships and personal experience, how older Americans use information on long-term care, and which policy measures they think would improve the long-term care system. Interviews were conducted March 13-April 23, 2014 with 1,745 adults age 40 and older. The sample includes 485 residents of California age 40 and older and an oversample of 458 Hispanics nationwide age 40 and older.

Data were used for the report, “Long-Term Care in America: Expectations and Reality,” as well as the issue briefs, “Long-Term Care in California” and “Long-Term Care: Experiences of Hispanics in the United States.”

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Long-Term Care: Perceptions, Experiences, and Attitudes among Americans 40 or Older

The 2013 Long-Term Care Poll examines the perceptions and misperceptions of Americans age 40 and older regarding the likelihood of needing long-term care services and the cost of those services, their attitudes and behaviors regarding planning for long-term care, and their understanding of the long-term care system. Interviews were conducted February 21-March 27, 2013 with 1,019 adults age 40 and older.

Data were used for the report, “Long-Term Care: Perceptions, Experiences, and Attitudes among Americans 40 and Older.”

DOWNLOAD: Public Use Files and Codebook